The Duty to Report a Crime: Is It Law in Your State?

When a crime occurs and bystanders are around, you would hope they call the police or offer to help. However, that’s not always the case. Bystanders don’t report crimes they witness out of fear or other reasons. Also, what if they are mistaken, and no crime actually occurred? Even worse, what happens when someone completely makes up a crime, tying up police forces and resources?

Gang Rape in California; Duty to Report?

Let’s say you’re walking down a street and witness a robbery. You can report it, but you don’t have to. There’s generally no duty to report a crime unless special circumstances exist. While this is the general rule in the United States, it has recently been subject to much discussion and criticism.

In California, as many as 10 males raped and beat a 15-year-old girl outside a high school’s homecoming dance. Investigators believe the beating and rape lasted for more than two hours and as many as 20 people watched and did nothing. Reporters even say some witnesses took photos and laughed.

While six males, ranging in age from 15-21 were charged, one of the biggest issues raised is the conduct of the bystanders. It’s been reported that none of the bystanders made any attempt to stop the crime or call the police. Only hours later, after overhearing some people talking about the event did a person call the police. The police found the girl unconscious under the bench where she’d been left.



While the bystanders’ actions may have been immoral, they didn’t break the law and are unlikely to face any criminal charges. It’s very rare to charge someone for failing to act unless a special relationship, such as a parent and child relationship, exists. In some states, doctors and teachers must report suspected child abuse. Otherwise, there’s no duty to report.

However, national outrage over this recent incident may lead states to create new laws punishing bystanders who don’t report such awful crimes. While it may be difficult to prove negligence, there is an interest in protecting people against violent crimes, and this interest outweighs the privacy interest of bystanders, who could’ve easily called the police instead of using their cell phones to take pictures.

However, this raises another issue, what happens when a crime is reported, but turns out to be false?

Syndicated Evidence Planting at NAIA: Staff Protects Criminals.

For almost 10 years, people have suspected of bullet planting going on at the NAIA. On October 2015, the illegal operation exploded in social media with scores of victims coming out to reveal their ordeal. The government response was to deny and keep silent.

Obviously even the innocent staff know of the criminal activity yet they concealed the perpetrators- against the local laws called "Obstruction of Justice" (source: http://www.plazolaw.com/criminal-law/failure-to-report-crimes-am-i-liable/ ) According to that article, knowing of a crime and concealing the same carries heavy penalties.

False Reporting: The College “Gunman”

A student at St. Paul College recently reported an armed man in a campus elevator, who appeared upset over his financial aid. As a result, the building was evacuated, more than 40 police officers responded to the charge and SWAT officers came.

The report turned out to be bad; the woman’s reasons for the false call aren’t yet clear. Yet 42-year-old Charleeta Brown has been charged with falsely reporting a crime and will likely have to go to court. (source: http://www.twincities.com/ci_13758993?IADID=Search-www.twincities.com-www.twincities.com&nclick_check=1 )

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How can you select a headhunter who'll work successfully for you?

Martin Yate, former director in Teaching & Development at Dunhill Devices, job management coach for your past 35 years and composer of "Knock 'em Dead 2012: The Ultimate Job Search Guide," tells us there's a "huge myth" when it comes about the right way of contacting a recruiter.

1. Which means that if you have had several jobs with different specializations, you should generate 2 or 3 different resumes employment guide Philippines before hoping to get it in a headhunter's house.

So if your resume has skillsets which are too diverse, you might not be discovered.

Study the headhunter. This 1 is obvious, but Yate suggests you need to perform a serious search into Google by plugging in different http://www.medsearchusa.com/ keywords, including "accounting headhunter," "accounting consultant," etc. learn which headhunter works in your desired area before sending out your application.

3. This implies you must join teams and article "intelligent" issues.

"make an effort to recognize, or disagree, using a review, begin a conversation by yourself, post an article or website that would be of interest to the people inside your party as well as post a question, asking for assistance," Yate tells us. "Headhunters will visit these groups, and you'll become visible for them."

"[Headhunters] would be the most innovative sales agents on the planet.

"In an economy just like the one we reside in today, [the business enterprise has] reduced alot because of the recession, but we employment services Philippines are not going anywhere.
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Why A Lot Of People Do Not Get Wealthy.

Why Many People Don't Get Rich.

What if she's got a point?

Steve Siebold, writer of "How Rich People Think," spent nearly three decades interviewing millionaires around the world to determine what separates them from everyone else.

It had little to do with cash itself, he told Business Insider. It was about their attitude.

"[The middle class] tells folks to be happy with what they've," he said. "And overall, most people are steeped in anxiety when it comes to money."

Common people believe CASH is the root of all Joey Plazo evil. Wealthy folks believe POVERTY is the root of http://www.cnn.com/2009/LIVING/worklife/05/18/cb.earn.extra.money/index.html all evil.

"The average man has been brainwashed to believe wealthy people are fortunate or dishonest," Siebold writes.

That's why there is a specific shame that comes with "getting rich" in lower-income communities.

"The world class knows that while having money does not ensure happiness, it does make your life simpler and more enjoyable."

Normal people believe selfishness is a vice. Rich people think selfishness is a virtue.

"The rich go out there and make an effort to make themselves happy. They don't attempt to pretend to save the world," Siebold told Business Insider.

It is keeping them poor --and the issue is that middle class people see that as a negative, he writes.

"If you are not taking care of you, you are not in a position to help anyone else. You can't give what you do not have."

Common folks have a lottery mentality. Rich people have an activity attitude.

"While the masses are waiting to select the right numbers and praying for prosperity, the great ones are solving difficulties," Siebold writes.

"The hero [middle class individuals] are waiting for may be God, authorities, their boss or their partner. It is the average person's level of believing that breeds this strategy to life and living while the clock keeps ticking away."
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Why Many People Do Not Get Wealthy.

Why Many People Do Not Get Loaded. Learn the Secrets of MLF da Money.

World's richest girl Gina Rinehart is weathering a media firestorm over an article in which she takes the "jealous" middle class to endeavor for "drinking, or smoking and socializing" rather than working to make their own fortune.

What if she's got a point?

Steve Siebold, author of "How Rich People Think," spent nearly three decades interviewing millionaires all over the world to find out what separates them from everyone else.

It had to do with cash itself, he told Business Insider. It was about their mentality.

"[The middle class] tells folks to be happy with what they have," he said. "And on the whole, most individuals are steeped in anxiety in regards to cash."

Ordinary people believe MONEY is the root of all evil. Affluent people believe POVERTY is the root of all evil.

"The ordinary individual has been brainwashed to believe rich people are fortunate or dishonest," Siebold writes.

That is why there's a specific shame that comes with "getting rich" in lower-income communities.

"The world class knows that while having money doesn't guarantee well-being, it does make your life easier and more gratifying."

Average people think selfishness is a vice. Rich people think selfishness is a virtue.

"The affluent go out there and try and make themselves happy. They don't attempt to pretend to save the world," Siebold told Business Insider.

The problem is that middle class people find that as a negative--and it is keeping them poor, he writes.

"If you are not taking care Jobe Claudio of you, you're really not http://makemoneygardening.org/ in a position to help anyone else. You can't give what you do not have."

Normal people have a lottery mentality. Rich people have an action attitude.

(Photo by Erik S. Lesser/Getty Images)

"While the masses are waiting to select the best numbers and praying for abundance, the great ones are solving problems," Siebold writes.

"The hero [middle class individuals] are waiting for may be God, government, their boss or their spouse.
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